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Wichita – Director of Utilities Calls for Water Restrictions

 

“We need the cooperation of residents, businesses and all customers to reduce the demand on the system,” says David Warren, the city’s director of water utilities. “Lawn irrigation contributes to the extra demand on our system this time of the year. Not watering grass for a week helps ensure that our basic water needs are met.” 

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City officials on Wednesday issued a stern warning for all of Wichita, asking residents to curtail their nonessential water use for at least the next week as major repairs are being made to one of the city’s major water treatment tanks.

The water restriction, which applies mostly watering lawns, is voluntary and should end on July 16. The water wall at the Hyatt Regency Wichita as well as other fountains around town will be shut off while the repair is being made in an effort to conserve water.

“We need the cooperation of residents, businesses and all customers to reduce the demand on the system,” says David Warren, the city’s director of water utilities. “Lawn irrigation contributes to the extra demand on our system this time of the year. Not watering grass for a week helps ensure that our basic water needs are met.”

The city says a “clarifier,” a device in the treatment plant that helps make water suitable for drinking, malfunctioned a week ago. Emergency repairs are being made, but the facility’s capacity has been reduced by more than half.

The city says indoor uses, such as bathing and drinking, can continue.

The water department will swap parts from its 15-million-gallon-a-day tank with the defective 60-million-gallon tank. The city still will have a daily capacity of 70 million gallons a day.

Wichita has contracted with Dondlinger & Sons Construction Co. to do the repair work.

“We’ve got what we believe are the best people in town to do this project,” Warren says.

The city, Warren says, couldn’t wait four to six weeks for parts to come in with one of its largest storage tanks out of commission. When the parts come in they will be put back into the tank.

Depending on the severity of the damage, the parts could cost between $3,000 and $35,000. In all, the repair could cost more than $100,000.

“The whole town is going to be affected by this,” Warren says. “We have to do this as a community.”

Source: Los Angeles Business Journal & Wichita Business Journal

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