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EPA Sets New Standards for Safety Guidelines for Exposure to Lead

Is it LEAD or an Encapsulated Lead Compound – the Difference Means A Lot to YOU!

* Lead is a naturally occurring heavy metal that can be found in extraordinary concentrations, even in nature, without any help from the weird science or pollution of man. Lead is treated as a seperate material from any lead compounds because the process of compounding will change the dynamics of it’s properties – Lead, in its natural form, is extremely bio-available; through ingestion, inhalation and absorption.

Lead Chromate is a chemical compound that combines lead and chromate together, as one.

Encapsulated Lead Chromate (widely adopted by the 1990s for use in colorizing synthetic yarn fibers for carpet and other fabrics) The lead chromate molecule is coated with a silica material  that binds to the lead chromate molecule and encapsulates (encircles ) the compound, making both heavy metals unable to be absorbed through skin,  through the airways and lungs by inhalation or through the mouth, gastrointestinal tract or stomach through ingestion, making silica encapsulated lead chromate a safe, hazard-free yellow pigment.

EPA Guidelines for Lead Exposure Standards

As part of EPA’s ongoing efforts to protect children from lead* poisoning, the Agency announces, new standards to identify dangerous levels of lead in paint, dust and soil. These new national standards are more protective than previous EPA guidance and will, for the first time, provide home owners, school and playground administrators, childcare providers and others with standards to protect children from hazards posed by lead, including children in federally-owned housing.

Under these new standards, federal agencies, including Housing and Urban Development, as well as state, local and tribal governments will have new uniform benchmarks on which to base remedial actions taken to safeguard children and the public from the dangers of lead. These standards will also apply to other Federal lead provisions, such as EPA’s real estate disclosure requirements presently in place for people selling or renting a home or apartment. These hazard standards will also serve as general guidance for other EPA programs engaged in toxic waste cleanups. In addition, these standards will provide landlords, parents, and childcare providers with specific levels on which to make informed decisions regarding lead found in their homes, yards, or play areas.

Under the new standards, lead is considered a hazard when equal to or exceeding: 40 micrograms of lead in dust per square foot on floors; 250 micrograms of lead in dust per square foot on interior window sills and 400 parts per million (ppm) of lead in bare soil in children’s play areas or 1200 ppm average for bare soil in the rest of the yard. 

Identifying lead hazards through these standards will allow inspectors and risk assessors to assist property owners in deciding how to address problems which may include lead paint abatement, covering or removing soil or professional cleaning of lead dust.

Health problems from exposure to lead can include profound developmental and neurological impairment in children. Lead poisoning has been linked to mental retardation, poor academic performance and juvenile delinquency. Nearly one million children in America today have dangerously elevated levels of lead in their blood. Because of the potential dangers, any exposure to deteriorated lead-based paint presents a hazard.
This action appears in the January 5, 2001 Federal Register (PDF) (36 pp, 357 KB, About PDF).

Contact the National Lead Information Center (NLIC) to speak with an information specialist.

* Lead is a naturally occurring heavy metal that can be found in extraordinary concentrations, even in nature, without any help from the weird science or pollution of man.

Lead Chromate is a chemical compound that combines lead and chromate together, as one.

Encapsulated Lead Chromate is the lead chromate molecule that has been coated with a silica material  that binds to the lead chromate molecule and encapsulates (encircles ) the compound, making both heavy metals unable to be absorbed through skin, inhalation or ingestion, making silica encapsulated lead chromate a safe, hazard-free yellow pigment.

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ASGi - the Association of Synthetic Grass Installers was founded in 2007 to help connect market partners and their customers in the artificial grass and synthetic turf industry. We have grown into a global presence, focused upon the niche markets of landscape and leisure sports. Take a moment, browse the site - or email or phone us if we can be of help in answering a question or locating information. Phone US TOLL FREE - 888-378-4581 View all posts by ASGi

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